How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

Are you planning to visit the Netherlands? Or a trip around Europe including a couple of days in the Netherlands? If you plan to travel around the Netherlands by train and are wondering how to do so, you have come to the right place!

I travel by train every day. I have done so since I was 14 years old and I commute to my work by train on a daily basis. Since I don’t own a car I use the train to visit family and friends as well, so I can certainly call myself an experienced train traveler.

Edit: I bought a car in July 2018, but still commute to work by train on a daily basis. 

The last couple of months I have been asked by foreigners if I could help them make sense of the Dutch train system on several occasions. What’s more, I have helped Dutch friends of mine travel by train! That’s why I created this guide: the ultimate guide to train travel in the Netherlands.

The ultimate guide to train travel in the Netherlands

With over 400 train stations, traveling by train in the Netherlands is definitely an excellent way of exploring the country and once you know how it works, traveling by train is really easy.

In this step by step guide I will share everything there is to know about traveling by train in the Netherlands, let’s get started!

  1. Some fun facts about train travel in the Netherlands
  2. How to travel by train in the Netherlands
    2.1 NS, the Dutch train company
    2.2 OV-chipkaart, the Dutch train ticket
    2.3 How to get an OV-chipkaart
    2.4 How to use the OV-chipkaart
  3. Important things to know about train travel in the Netherlands
  4. A little less important but still good to know about train travel in the Netherlands…
  5. Convenient websites for train travel in the Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

You can click on the section of your interest or keep reading for the whole story…

1. Some fun facts about train travel in the Netherlands

• The first train track in the Netherlands was opened in 1839 and connected Amsterdam with Haarlem.
• The Dutch train network is the 3rd busiest in the world, only the networks in Switzerland and Japan are used more intensively.
• Each day over 1.2 million people travel by train in the Netherlands, meaning it can get pretty busy…

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

2. How to travel by train in the Netherlands

2.1 NS, the Dutch train company

The first thing you have to know about train travel in the Netherlands is that most of the trains are owned and operated by NS, fully called ‘Nederlandse Spoorwegen’. The colors of the NS are a distinctive blue and yellow (as you can see in the picture above). The website of the NS is www.ns.nl and much of the information provided is also available in English.

2.2 OV-chipkaart, the Dutch train ticket

Since 2014 the only way you can travel by train in the Netherlands is with an OV-chipkaart, a credit card format pass that you use for all public transport.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

There are 3 types of the OV-chipkaart:

1. Disposable: singe use, cannot be topped up.
2. Anonymous: unlimited use, can be topped up.
3. Personal: unlimited use, can be used for discount plans.

Basically, when you are planning on traveling by train just once, get the disposable card. If you plan to travel by train multiple times, get the anonymous chip card. If you plan on staying in the Netherlands for a longer period of time, get the personal chip card and investigate which discount plan is most suitable for you. More information about the different types of the OV-chipkaart can be found here.

2.3 How to get an OV-chipkaart

Buying an OV-chipkaart is simple, you look for a machine identical to the LEFT one in the picture below. I know it looks pretty much the same as the machine on the right, but there is a slight difference.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

The machine on the left is for buying a new OV-chipkaart, the one on the right is only for topping up (doesn’t dispense new cards).

The one on the left with the rail symbol can be used to buy a new card, the machine on the right (with OV-chipkaarthouders written at the top) can only be used to top up cards.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

Now that you have located the proper ticket machine, the next step is to get yourself a brand new OV-chipkaart.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands step 1
Click English, this will make choosing the right buttons a lot easier;-). Unless you really want to learn Dutch, in which case: GO AHEAD!
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
If you are going to make several trips by train or other public transport you’ll want to get an OV-chipkaart.
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
The costs for an OV-chipkaart are €7,50 and the card is valid for 5 years. An excellent reason to plan a return trip to the Netherlands!
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
In order to travel by train, you’ll need a minimum of €20 on your OV-chipkaart.
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
Choose your preferred payment method. You can try your usual bank card, but if that doesn’t work you can pay with credit card as well.
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands step 6
On the left is the payment terminal, which accepts Maestro cards and Credit Cards. On the right is the touch pad for the OV-chipkaart, if you put the card on the pad you can check your balance and top-up your card.

All right, you are all set up with a brand new loaded OV-chipkaart ready for use, your next step is to check in…

2.4 How to use the OV-chipkaart

Now that you have a brand new topped up OV-chipkaart you are almost ready to hop aboard a brightly colored blue and yellow train.

Almost…

When traveling by train in the Netherlands you should NEVER forget to CHECK-IN! Checking in can be done at gates and poles looking like this:

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

Alright, you have checked in and can now hop aboard the train to your desired destination. Equally important: don’t forget to CHECK-OUT when you have arrived at your destination. You do this at the gates or poles as well.

There is one exception and this is where it goes wrong for many travelers (and not just travelers, many Dutch people as well). For some travels by train you will have to check-out with NS and check-in with another train company transporting you to your final destination.

Say what?

Yes I know, it’s confusing. The thing is, while the NS operates on the vast majority the train tracks, there are small parts of track that are operated by other companies, particularly in the North, East and South of the Netherlands.

So if you visit places further off the beaten track you can find yourself in the situation where you feel like you have done everything right (you bought your OV-chipkaart, you charged it, you check-in) and still get fined… Because you failed to complete this tiny and stupid step of checking out with NS and checking in with the appropriate other company.

Other companies operating on small parts of the Dutch train tracks are Arriva, Synthus, Connexxion, Veolia and Arriva Vechtdallijnen.

This sign explains transferring from one train company to another.
This sign explains transferring from one train company to another.

On the top half of the sign in the picture it says: Transferring from Connexxion to NS -> step 1: Check-out with Connexxion, step 2: Check-in with NS. On the bottom half of the sign vice versa.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

Whenever you find yourself at a station with poles in any other color than blue-yellow, and the train you are getting into isn’t blue and yellow either, make sure to check out at an NS pole and check in at the pole of the train company transporting you to your next destination.

Train travel in the Netherlands
Train not operated by NS: not blue and yellow and it says Arriva on the side. This should be a pretty obvious clue for you to start looking for the correct check-in pole;-).

If you aren’t sure, just ask somebody to help you, either the train staff or people at the station. Almost everybody in the Netherlands speaks English and is willing to help you out making sense of this unnecessarily complicated system…

You might be wondering: how do I use my Eurail card in the Netherlands? Do I need to check in as well? And is my Eurail card suitable for checking in?

Well, you are not the only one. A reader of this blog asked my this question and I spent quite a bit of time googling the answer because I was actually rather curious myself.

How does traveling in the Netherlands with a Eurail pass work?

I couldn’t find the answer online anywhere so I decided to make a call to the NS. The call took over 45 minutes as the lady on the phone had never had this question before so it took some digging but ultimately I got this answer: before you arrive in the Netherlands (about 5 working days before) you can send an email to keycard@ns.nl.

You will receive an email with a square barcode. This barcode can be scanned (from paper or from your phone) at the check-in gates and they will open. You will need this because at some train station you can only get to the platform via an entrance gate.

Please note the barcode is only to open the gates, it’s not a valid ticket to travel. When asked for your ticket you can show your Eurail pass to the train staff, as this is valid in NL. You can read more information here.

On the page it says you can only get a keycard if you have a certain type of NS subscriptions on your OV-chipkaart, please ignore that. The NS customer service lady on the phone assured me this was the way to go for a Eurail pass.

3. Important things to know about train travel in the Netherlands

There are 2 classes in the train, 1st and 2nd class. The class is indicated on the side of the train and also inside the train. A standard OV-chipkaart gives you access to 2nd class, for the 1st class you’ll have to buy a supplement. But that’s really not necessary, second class will do just fine, only during rush hour it can get pretty crowded. All trains in the Netherlands are non-smoking. Because smoking is gross and will kill you…

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

In the picture below you can see three symbols. The first one indicates the class (1st class in this case). If you see the symbol in the middle, it means the compartment you are about to enter is a silence compartment. You cannot talk in these compartment as people are working, reading, sleeping or most likely: glued to their phone;-). The arrow you’ll only see in a
bi-level or doubledecker trains, it simply means that if you go up the stairs you’ll find a 1st class compartment where you’ll have to be quiet.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

In almost all the trains there is a toilet (which is usually also very gross, so try not to use it), except in the so-called ‘Sprinters’. If you find yourself in need of a restroom while riding one of these you’re out of luck…

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
A Sprinter train. No bathroom on board… Though the newer versions of this train do have a toilet because of the massive amounts of complaints the NS got from travelers 😉

We Dutch people love complaining, and we sure complain a lot about the NS. Which isn’t always fair because as I mentioned, the Dutch rail system is one of the busiest in the world and according to the latest statistics 95% of the train are on time. But every now and than you may find yourself in the situation where the train is delayed. You’ll see this on the information displays, like in the picture below.

Train Travel In The Netherlands Explained

In general, if you hear or read the word ‘Vertraging’ (which is Dutch for delay), you know you’ll be waiting a little while…

4. A little less important but still good to know about train travel in the Netherlands…

If you are traveling in rush hour, you may be a little shocked by the non existing queuing skills of Dutch people.

It never really struck me as strange that the Dutch way of entering a train is to push as hard as you can to secure yourself a seat. Even if that means that people getting out of the train are having an impossible time to do so.

But after living in London for 4 months, I realized this behavior is actually quite strange. Some might even call it rude.

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

The British on the other hand have practically invented queuing, when I was queuing for a day ticket for Wimbledon I received a 25 page booklet titled ‘The Guide To Queuing’. LOL! Anyway, if you are traveling by train in the Netherlands, apologies for our non-existent queuing behavior, it’s just not our thing.

Something else that really annoys me is how people in the Netherlands DON’T STAND ON THE PROPER SIDE OF THE ESCALATOR! I don’t get it, stand on the right, walk on the left, it’s that simple!

But apparently we as a nation are unable to follow these instruction, stupid, ignorant or just don’t care. So if you ever miss your train because people refuse to step aside, don’t say I didn’t warn you;-).

5. Convenient websites for train travel in the Netherlands

The most important website for train travel is www.ns.nl/en. This is the official website of ‘Nederlandse Spoorwegen’, the main Dutch train company. On this website you can find general travel information, information about tickets and plan your journey. The NS also has an app for Android  and iPhone , I am not sure about the Windows one (but then again, who uses that anyway;-).

How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands
How To Travel By Train In The Netherlands

Another excellent site and app to plan your journey if it involves more than travel by train is www.9292ov.nl. This site and app also includes information about traveling by bus, metro, tram and even ferry.

Both websites are available in English, the apps can also be set to English once you downloaded them.

On this website you can find a map of all the train tracks in the Netherlands and which company operates on which part of the track. As I said before, the NS operates on the fast majority of the tracks, so changes are slim that you’ll travel with other companies. But you can take a look at this map to make sure and quickly see if the place you want to travel to has a train station at all;-).

All right, that’s about it! Below you can download the step by step guide how to get an OV-chipkaart. Feel free to ask any questions you may have by leaving a comment below.

Looking for more travel planning resources? Check out the Phenomenal Globe Travel Planning Library and my Travel Resource page!

Enjoy traveling by train in the Netherlands!

With over 400 train station, traveling by train in the Netherlands is an excellent option to explore the country. Read everything you need to know about traveling by train in the Netherlands. How to buy your ticket, important things to know about train travel and convenient train travel websites. #traintravel #netherlands
With over 400 train station, traveling by train in the Netherlands is an excellent option to explore the country. Read everything you need to know about traveling by train in the Netherlands. How to buy your ticket, important things to know about train travel and convenient train travel websites. #traintravel #netherlands

This post was updated in December 2018

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38 Comments

  1. Carol Colborn
    February 27, 2016 / 5:44 pm

    Nice detailed feature. The trains look so clean and, thus, portray efficiency!

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 27, 2016 / 11:39 pm

      Thanks Carol:-)

  2. February 27, 2016 / 9:30 pm

    I spent some time in the Netherlands last year and was really impressed with how easy the trains were to navigate for someone who doesn’t know the language. I have to agree with you about the queuing though!

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 27, 2016 / 11:38 pm

      Haha yeah, the non-queuing is it’s quite annoying;-)

  3. February 28, 2016 / 12:16 am

    This is a really great guide! I love it that the Netherlands promotes train travel so well and makes it really work for people. I’d love to see this take off in the U.S., but we’re so far behind with train infrastructure that I’m sure it’ll never happen.

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 28, 2016 / 10:00 am

      Haha, to be fair, distances are a lot smaller in the Netherlands = a lot less infrastructure to be taken care off;-)

  4. February 28, 2016 / 9:43 am

    It used to be much easier! Recently (~1-2 years ago) they changed the rules, and now it’s a bit painful…

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 28, 2016 / 9:57 am

      There used to be paper tickets (until 2014), which was certainly easier;-)

  5. February 28, 2016 / 10:01 am

    Hi Lotte, wow such a detailed post! Love the way how you help foreigners who do not speak Dutch with your on-screen translations. I can imagine how confused it must be to see “Niet Instappen” on the big screen and not knowing what to do.
    I didn’t know about the OV-card. It’s a good thing, they should introduce a similar system here in Belgium too, would be a lot easier and time-saving. Great post, cheers from Jempi 🙂

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 28, 2016 / 11:03 am

      Thank you Jempi, I really appreciate you saying that:-). Once you know how the OV-card works, it’s pretty easy to get around!

  6. February 29, 2016 / 2:33 am

    What a complete and picturesque post! I’d love to test your tips out one day in the Netherlands.

    • Lotte
      Author
      February 29, 2016 / 10:38 am

      Thank you Elaine:-) I hope you get to visit the Netherlands one day, let me know if you do!

  7. March 1, 2016 / 12:04 am

    Third busiest in the world! Wow, I had no idea. I’m glad you’ve made this guide. I hope to visit the Netherlands soon. 🙂

    • Lotte
      Author
      March 1, 2016 / 9:16 am

      I will be honest and say I looked this up online;-) I knew the train network was busy but I didn’t know it was in the top 3 worldwide! Anyway, very cool you’ll be visiting the Netherlands soon. Let me know if you do and need any tips where to go!

  8. March 1, 2016 / 6:32 am

    I love love love train rides, but getting on them is always a test of skill and a lot of hoping that I got it right! Thank you for this, definitely bookmarked for future reference!

    • Lotte
      Author
      March 1, 2016 / 9:14 am

      I know! I love train rides too and think it’s a great way to see a country. But it can be a struggle trying to work out which ticket, which train, which seat, etc… Glad I could help out for the Netherlands:-)

  9. March 1, 2016 / 7:21 am

    I am amazed the Netherlands has 400 train stations. I am impressed. Great recommendations. It sounds confusing and I am not even trying to get on the train. I am glad to see trains are very popular in the Netherlands.

    • Lotte
      Author
      March 1, 2016 / 9:13 am

      Haha I agree it’s quite a lot for such a small country;-)

  10. March 7, 2016 / 10:25 am

    Really great info! Bookmarking for my next visit to the Netherlands. I remember public transportation was so nice there, from trains to trams. And love the honesty system. 🙂

    • Lotte
      Author
      March 7, 2016 / 12:29 pm

      Thanks Liz:-) Let me know next time you’re in the Netherlands, it would be lovely to meet up!

  11. Maria Pelaez
    January 12, 2018 / 11:49 am

    Great article, may I leave some doubts/comments here? 1. Are you allowed to eat in the trains or is there any known rule? For example in the silent rooms?… 2. Do you know by chance if there is any place to charge either your phone or laptop? The ICE-DB in Germany has for example places to plug and charged your devices and even in some Arriva buses there are USB Portals. 3. You could also mention a warning when buying something the programs of the OVChipkaart, the majority are for a year subscription but the monthly fee is the only one that is shown, at the beginning you think you can cancel if you don’t need it anymore but it’s not always possible unless you have a very good reason.

    • Lotte
      Author
      January 12, 2018 / 6:22 pm

      Hi Maria,

      Thanks and of course you may! About your comments/questions:
      1. You are allowed to eat in the train. It’s common courtesy not to eat strong-smelling foods but there are no formal rules. As long as you don’t make a mess and clean up your trash you are allowed to eat on the train. In the silence compartment the rule is to be silent. So no chatting with your friend or calling your mom;-).
      2. Unfortunately NS has not yet outfitted the second class carriages with sockets. In first class you can charge laptops and phones but tickets are a lot more expensive…
      3. You are right that if you buy a subscription most are valid for a year, which cannot be cancelled. However, if you are only in the Netherlands for a couple of days you most likely do not need a subscription. Instead, all you need to do is buy an anonymous OV-chip-card and add value (which can be done at the same machine you bought the card). This will enable you to travel on the metro/tram/bus and train everywhere in the Netherlands.

      I hope I answered all your questions/comments. Let me know!
      Lotte

  12. Marwa
    May 13, 2018 / 2:09 am

    Thank you so much for this informative article, I was really lost and I had to google all this week about the transportation topic in Netherlands. So glad I found your blog!

    We are a family of wife, husband and a 18th months baby. We are visiting the Netherlands from the 17th of June to the 23rd of June, leaving on the 23rd from Shiphol airport. We are staying 3 nights in Den Haag, then 3 nights in Utrecht, and we are planning to make day trips to Amsterdam (of course) and other cities, so I was wondering if there is a transport card that allows tourists to use train/bus/tram for 7 days that saves us some money? I mean for example the metro ticket is for €1,90, but we can buy 10 tickets for €14,90, good saving! Also, which places/cities should we visit during these 7 days?

    Thanks for your help..

    • Lotte
      Author
      May 13, 2018 / 5:57 pm

      Hi Marwa, thank you so much for reading my blog! How wonderful you will be coming to the Netherlands:-). About your transport question, there is something called the Holland Travel Ticket but it’s quite expensive (https://www.ns.nl/producten/en/onbeperkt-reizen/p/holland-travel-ticket). Alternatively, you can buy several combination tickets here: https://www.spoordeelwinkel.nl/stedentrips. The downside is that the website is in Dutch but with Google translate you should be okay. With these tickets you can visit several cities in the Netherlands (such as Amsterdam, Groningen, Maastricht and the famous village Giethoorn). There is also a Dutch website called Treinreiziger (https://www.treinreiziger.nl/goedkoop-treinkaartje/) where you can find monthly promotions of train tickets. For example, Blokker and Albert Heijn regularly sell cheap train tickets, you can buy them in the stores. It’s important to check the travel conditions, usually you have to wait until 9am before you can check in and travel.

      During your time in The Hague I recommend visiting Scheveningen and to take a trip to the Deltawerken, they are quite impressive and it’s interesting to read about the Dutch history and our constant battle with water. Leiden and Delft are also beautiful old cities and easily reached from the Hague.

      Of course I am a little biased living in Utrecht, but definitely spend a day exploring this beautiful old city. Let me know if you want more tips for Utrecht, I’ll be happy to share some places for lunch and things to do:-).

      Giethoorn village is lovely (I grew up in that area) and the Veluwe is beautiful for hiking. Depending on your accommodation and if it offers parking you may want to consider renting a car to reach these places, distances are small in the Netherlands and the roads are very well maintained. On your way to Giethoorn you could visit Havelte and the Hunebedden in Drente.

      I hope you’ll have nice weather and a lovely trip around my home country!
      Lotte

      • Marwa
        May 13, 2018 / 6:56 pm

        Thank you Lotte for your quick reply,

        It’s great to hear that you are living in Utrecht, if you can share with me tips for our 3 nights there.The hiking sounds interesting but I’m not sure if I’ll be able to do it with my baby 🙂
        by the way, I’ll be staying at an airbnb place at Billitonkade in Utrecht, so do you know from where I can rent bikes with a baby seat attached there ?
        I don’t think we will be able to hire a car, it’ll be so expensive, we will have to use the train then.
        The trip cost is adding up every day 😀 My brain is going to explode planning for everything in Paris and Netherlands for this trip 🙂

        I took a look at the websites you shared but got lost as usual even with google translator, they should hire someone with your talent who can explain everything that CLEARLY, thank you again.

        Marwa.

  13. Marwa
    May 21, 2018 / 12:54 am

    Thank you so so much Lotte, sorry for the late reply, I just lost your blog for a while, luckily I found it again today:) Thank you. Will definitely contact you once I arrive to Den Haag on the 17th. Thank you! Marwa.

    • Lotte
      Author
      May 21, 2018 / 9:15 pm

      Hi Marwa, no worries! Enjoy planning your Paris and Netherlands trip and send me a message if you have any more question:-) Lotte

  14. Graham
    August 28, 2018 / 11:30 am

    Hi Lotte, brilliant information, visiting family and friends in June 2019, first time in the Netherlands.
    The OV chip card, if there is any money on this can it be refunded to me or must I use it all.
    As one mention before me, so much to take in, but your assistance was great.
    from South Africa

    • Lotte
      Author
      August 29, 2018 / 10:28 am

      Hi Graham,

      I’m glad you found my post helpful! I hope you have a nice trip to the Netherlands in 2019 with plenty of time to see your family and friends, plus to explore my little but beautiful country:-)

      Regarding the OV chip-card, you can get the remaining money back. To do so you have to visit a NS service desk at one of the bigger stations, they will refund the money on your card. Please note that they will not refund amounts higher than 30 euro, so it’s best to check at a machine what your credit is before going to the service desk.

      Again, have a wonderful trip!
      Lotte

  15. Heather
    December 22, 2018 / 1:57 pm

    Hi Lotte,
    I loved reading your super informative article and all the comments and answers as well. My question for you is this, my husband and I purchased a eurail pass that gets us unlimited travel in something like 20 countries. (We are really only going to visit The Netherlands, some Germany and some parts of France) but how would this pass work for Amsterdam and surrounding areas? With the checking in and out at the stations and getting the chip card, do we still do that even if we have these eurail passes? Any insight would be much appreciated. Thank you!!
    Heather

    • Lotte
      Author
      December 24, 2018 / 1:59 pm

      Hi Heather,

      Thank you for your kind comment, I’m happy to hear you liked the post:-) I’ve made a call to the NS because I was actually rather curious myself how traveling in the Netherlands with a Eurail pass would work. The call took over 45 minutes as the lady on the phone had never had this question before so it took some digging but ultimately I got this answer: before you arrive in the Netherlands (about 5 working days before) you can send an email to keycard@ns.nl. You will receive an email with a square barcode. This barcode can be scanned (from paper or from your phone) at the check-in gates and they will open. You will need this because at some train station you can only get to the platform via an entrance gate. Please note the barcode is only to open the gates, it’s not a valid ticket to travel. When asked for your ticket you can show your Eurail pass to the train staff, as this is valid in NL. You can read more information here: https://www.nsinternational.nl/en/buying-train-tickets/international-travel-and-opening-gates. I hope this helps! Have a great trip:-)

      Lotte

      • Heather
        December 26, 2018 / 3:42 am

        You have to be the niceset lady ever to take time out of your day to find that out for us. A HUGE thank you and a hug goes to you. We will follow these instructions for sure. This will really help knowing this advance. Thanks again!!

        • Lotte
          Author
          December 27, 2018 / 5:10 pm

          Haha no worries! I was genuinely curious to understand how that would work myself:-) Have a great trip and feel free to send me an email if you run into any trouble during your trip!

  16. Maria
    January 4, 2019 / 2:33 pm

    First of all, I want to say that this article is amazing and extremely helpful so thank you for helping hundreds of people 🙂 I will soon be starting my studies in the Netherlands, however I will most probably have to move to another city in my second year (and still go to university in the first city), so since you said that you’ve been taking the train on a daily basis for a long time now, I wanted to ask you if you think that would be possible? To travel every day by train, considering it’s only 40 minutes between the two cities (I’ve also heard that trains often get delayed with 2-3 hours because of accidents)?

    • Lotte
      Author
      January 9, 2019 / 9:36 am

      Hi Maria,

      Thank you very much for your kind words, happy to hear you found my train travel post helpful:-) I hope you have a great time studying in the Netherlands!

      Regarding your question, trains are rarely delayed for 2-3 hours. In fact, that only happens during major incidents such as severe snowfall or storms. Therefore, I feel you wouldn’t have to move because of the 40 minute commute. But perhaps it would be interesting to live in two different Dutch cities? Have a wonderful time in NL and let me know if you have any other questions.

      Lotte

  17. Sofia
    January 13, 2019 / 4:30 am

    Thank you for posting this. It is very helpful as I am currently planning my trip to the Netherlands 🙂

    • Lotte
      Author
      January 14, 2019 / 9:04 pm

      Thank you Sofia, I’m happy to hear that! Enjoy your trip to the Netherlands:-)

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